LE FORUM DES CERCLOSOPHES
LE FORUM DES CERCLOSOPHES
 
 LE FORUM DES CERCLOSOPHES  Forums des anciens  Section histoire et archéologie 

 Adn néolithique

Nouveau sujet   Répondre
 
Bas de pagePages : 1  
massirio
388 messages postés
   Posté le 25-03-2012 à 12:53:26   Voir le profil de massirio (Offline)   Répondre à ce message   Envoyer un message privé à massirio   

Starcevo Culture and Linear Pottery Culture (c. 8,000 to 6,500 ybp ; Central & Southeast Europe)

Haak et al. (2005) and Haak et al. (2010) sequenced the mitochondrial DNA from several LBK sites in Germany and one in Austria dating from 5500 BCE to 4900 BCE. Out of the 38 mtDNA lineages recovered there were six haplogroup N (one N1a, one N1a1a, two N1a1a1, two N1a1a2, and one N1a1b), two U (U3 and U5a1a), seven K, four J, ten T (including three T2), three HV, eight H, two V, and two W.

The Y-chromosomal DNA of three samples was also successfully retrieved and assigned to haplogroup F* (2 samples) and G2a3 .
Bramanti et al. (2008) tested the mtDNA from the LBK site of Vedrovice (5300 BCE) in the Czech Republic. Two samples were found to belong to haplogroup K, one to J1c, two to T2 and the last one to H.

Guba et al. (2011) analysed the mtDNA of 11 Neolithic skeletons from Hungary. Among the five specimens from the Kőrös culture (5500 BCE), two carried the mutations of haplogroup N9a and one of C5. Another one had a series of mutations not seen in any haplogroup to this day (16235G, 16261T, 16291T, 16293G, 16304C). The last one didn't have any mutation from the CRS in the HVS-I region and is therefore undetermined. Out of the six specimens from the LBK-related Alföld Culture (5250-5000 BCE) three belonged to haplogroup N (N1a, N1a1b, N9a), and one to haplogroup D1 or G1a1 . The two others were undetermined (CRS and 16324C mutation reported as M/R24).

Cucuteni-Trypillian Culture (c. 7,500 to 4,750 ybp ; Romania, Moldova, Ukraine)
Nikitin et al. (2010) studied the remains of the Eneolithic site of Verteba Cave (3600-2500 BCE) in Western Ukraine. They retrieved the mtDNA of seven individuals, which were assigned to haplogroup pre-HV, HV or V (2 samples), H (2 samples), J and T4.


Cardium Pottery Culture (c. 8,400 to 4,700 ybp ; Mediterranean Europe)

Chandler et al. (2005) sequenced the mtDNA of four Neolithic skeletons from the Impressed Ware Culture of Portugal (5500-4750 BCE), and found two members of haplogroup U (U and U5), one of H and one of V.

Lacan et al. (2011) tested 29 skeletons from a 5,000-year-old site in Treilles, Languedoc, France. Twenty paternal lineages (Y-DNA) were identified as G2a, while the two others belonged to haplogroup I2a.

The maternal lineages (mtDNA) comprised six haplogroup U (including four U5 and one U5b1c), two K1a, six J1, two T2b, two HV0, six H (three H1 and three H3), one V, and four X2.

The two I2a men belonged to mtDNA haplogroup H1 and H3.




Lacan et al. (2011 bis) tested 7 skeletons from a 7,000-year-old Neolithic site from the Avellaner Cave in Cogolls, Catalonia, Spain .

Six paternal lineages (Y-DNA) were identified including five G2a and one E1b1b1a1b (E-V13).
There were three mtDNA haplogroup K1a, two T2b, one H3, and one U5.


The team of Fernández et al. (2006) and Gamba et al. (2008) analysed the mitochondrial HVR-I in 37 bone and teeth samples from 17 archaeological sites located around Castellón de la Plana, Valencia, Spain. Most of the results were inconclusive though. Out of the 12 mtDNA sequences from the Chalcolithic period that were retrieved, four were reported as haplogroup L3, four as H (including three CRS, which could be non-results), two to R0, HV or H, one to V, and one to D.

Gamba et al. (2011) identified the mtDNA of 10 Early Neolithic (5000-5500 BCE) samples from the sites of Can Sadurni and Chaves and three Late Early Neolithic (4250-3700 BCE) from Sant Pau del Camp, all around Barcelona, Spain. The coding region was also tested to confirm the haplogroups. The results included haplogroups N* (4 samples), H (4 samples including one H20), U5 (1 sample), K (3 samples) and X1 (1 sample) .

Atlantic Megalithic Culture (c. 7,000 to 4,000 ybp ; Western Europe)

Deguilloux et al. (2010) examined skeletons from the Péré tumulus, a megalithic long mound (4200 BCE) in Brittany , and retrieved the mtDNA of three individuals. They belonged to haplogroup N1a, U5b and X2.

Sampietro et al. (2007) analysed the HVRI mitochondrial DNA sequences of 11 Neolithic remains from the Cami de Can Grau site (3500 BCE) in Granollers, Catalonia, Spain. Four skeletons belonged to haplogroup H (including three CRS, which could be non-results), two to J, two to T2, one to U4, one to I1 and one to W1.

In a study focusing mostly on the site of Tell Halula in Syria, Fernández et al. (2008) also tested two skeletons from the Nerja caves near Málaga, Andalusia, Spain . The first individual (3875 BCE) carried the mutations 16126C 16264T 16270T 16278T 16293G 16311C, and the second 16129A, 16264T, 16270T, 16278T, 16293G, 16311C. Both sequences could correspond either to haplogroup H11a (typical of Central Europe) or more probably L1b1 (found in the Canaries and Northwest Africa).

In one pioneering ancient DNA study N. Izagirre and C. de la Rua (1999) of the University of the Basque Country, analysed the mtDNA variations in 121 dental samples from four Basque prehistoric sites. Among them, 61 samples from the late Neolithic site of San Juan Ante Portam Latinam (3300-3042 BCE) in Araba were found to belong to haplogroups H (23 samples), J (10 samples), U (11 samples), K (14 samples) and T or X (3 samples).

The site of Pico Ramos (2790-2100 BCE) in Bizkaia yielded 24 results including haplogroups H (9 samples), J (4 samples), U (3 samples), K (4 samples) and T or X (4 samples).

The site of Longar (2580-2450 BCE) in Nafarroa had 27 individuals H (11 samples), U (4 samples), K (6 samples), T or X (4 samples) and two other unidentified haplogroups.

Finally, the site of Tres Montes in Navarra (2130 BCE) possessed 3 samples that appeared to belong to haplogroup L2 and two others that were undetermined (16224C and 16126C+16311C).
The authors noted the conspicuous absence of haplogroup V, now present at a relatively high frequency among the Basques (6.5%).

Fernández et al. (2005) tested the mtDNA of remains from the Abauntz site (2240 BCE) in Navarra. All three samples retrieved were inconclusive regarding the mitochondrial haplogroup. One sample was CRS (no mutation found). Another had 16126C+16311C, which would be R0a, HV0a or a subclade of H, among many other possibilities. The last one (16256T) could be H1x, H14 or even U5a.


Funnelbeaker Culture (c. 6,000 to 4,700 ybp ; Northern Europe)
Malmström et al. (2009) tested three mtDNA sequences from a megalithic site (3500-2500 BCE) in Gökhem, Sweden. They identified haplogroups H, J and T.
Bramanti et al. (2009) tested seven skeletal materials from Ostorf (3200-3000 BCE) in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany, and identified the haplogroups as U5 (3 samples including one U5a), K and T2e (2 samples) and J.


Bell Beaker Culture (c. 4,400 to 3,800 ybp ; Western Europe)

Melchior et al. (2010) managed to retrieve two mtDNA sequences from the Damsbo site (4200 BCE) in Denmark , which belonged to haplogroups U4 and U5a2a.


Edité le 25-03-2012 à 12:56:03 par massirio




--------------------
martiko
dieu, le vrai! certifié France
martiko
5138 messages postés
   Posté le 25-03-2012 à 14:58:40   Voir le profil de martiko (Offline)   Répondre à ce message   Envoyer un message privé à martiko   

l'haplogroupe mt K est beaucoup moins rare vers les Asturies et la Castille, que au pays basque et il est normal d'en trouver un peu dans les régions avoisinantes du pays basque et c'est pareil pour le groupe yDNA I. Mais le groupe V est présent chez basques et Catalans de manière très importantes en comparaison des autres populations d'Europe excepté les nordiques et ouraliens et cela personne ne s'est risqué à l'expliquer de peur peut être de casser l'aborigénitude des basques comme pour R-L238 trop proche de M-153.


Edité le 25-03-2012 à 15:04:25 par martiko




--------------------
aime la littératures
massirio
388 messages postés
   Posté le 25-03-2012 à 15:02:52   Voir le profil de massirio (Offline)   Répondre à ce message   Envoyer un message privé à massirio   

Comme on peut voir J1c et T étaient les haplogroupes des premiers agriculteurs du Sud est de l'Europe.

--------------------
martiko
dieu, le vrai! certifié France
martiko
5138 messages postés
   Posté le 25-03-2012 à 15:07:21   Voir le profil de martiko (Offline)   Répondre à ce message   Envoyer un message privé à martiko   

J1cet T seraient surtout des éleveurs venant de l'est et lié avec yDNA R1.
L'agriculture semble être amené par yDNA G2a/mtDNA X.


Edité le 25-03-2012 à 15:13:46 par martiko




--------------------
aime la littératures
massirio
388 messages postés
   Posté le 25-03-2012 à 15:08:29   Voir le profil de massirio (Offline)   Répondre à ce message   Envoyer un message privé à massirio   

martiko a écrit :

ils apparaissent surtout comme des éleveurs venant de l'est.


Comment le savez vous?

--------------------
massirio
388 messages postés
   Posté le 25-03-2012 à 15:10:49   Voir le profil de massirio (Offline)   Répondre à ce message   Envoyer un message privé à massirio   

Dans les agriculteurs Cardiaux de Treilles dont l'haplogroupe Y était G2a, il y avait 6 haplogroupe mt J1 et deux T2

--------------------
martiko
dieu, le vrai! certifié France
martiko
5138 messages postés
   Posté le 25-03-2012 à 15:23:13   Voir le profil de martiko (Offline)   Répondre à ce message   Envoyer un message privé à martiko   

le site est de 2500 ans avant notre ère et les groupes mtDNA J et T ainsi que R1a étaient déjà en Europe et sur le nombre de squelettes ce n'est pas une proportion importante. On trouve parfois au pays basque des mtDNA K aussi et même si c'est rare.
Les pic de J se trouve en Allemagne, je crois, et T2 en Yougoslavie/Ukraine.


Edité le 25-03-2012 à 15:26:48 par martiko




--------------------
aime la littératures
massirio
388 messages postés
   Posté le 25-03-2012 à 15:30:00   Voir le profil de massirio (Offline)   Répondre à ce message   Envoyer un message privé à massirio   

martiko a écrit :

le site est de 2500 ans avant notre ère et les groupes mtDNA J et T ainsi que R1a étaient déjà en Europe et sur le nombre de squelettes ce n'est pas une proportion importante. On trouve parfois au pays basque des mtDNA K aussi et même si c'est rare.
Les pic de J se trouve en Allemagne, je crois, et T2 en Yougoslavie/Ukraine.


Sur18 indivius G2a il y avait 6 J1 et deux T2 ce qui fait quasiment la moitié.

Et 3000 ans avant jc il n'y avait ps R1a en Europe. Les premiers R1a en Europe datent de la céramique cordé. On n'a pas retrouvé R1a dans de l'adn ancien en Europe de l'ouest.

--------------------
martiko
dieu, le vrai! certifié France
martiko
5138 messages postés
   Posté le 25-03-2012 à 15:33:37   Voir le profil de martiko (Offline)   Répondre à ce message   Envoyer un message privé à martiko   

je pense que au paléolithique l'ensemble de l'Europe était une région toute pourave et qu'il ne serait venu l'envie à personne de s'y installer , comme pour le Sahara actuel, sauf les Touaregs qui y sont nés, personne n'a envie de s'y installer actuellement.
Voir climatologie de l'Europe au néolithique!


Edité le 25-03-2012 à 15:34:20 par martiko




--------------------
aime la littératures
massirio
388 messages postés
   Posté le 25-03-2012 à 15:39:02   Voir le profil de massirio (Offline)   Répondre à ce message   Envoyer un message privé à massirio   

Oui, c'est seulement au néolithique que des populations en provenance du Levant, d'anatolie et des Balkans apportent J et T et G2a en Europe, aussi bien dans le courant danubien (rubanné que méditérranéen (Cardial).

Selon wikipedia, l'haplogroupe J (mtdna) a sa fréquence maximale au moyen orient, suivi par l'Eurpe, le caucase et l'Afrique du Nord.


Average frequency of J Haplogroup as a whole is highest in the Near East (12%) followed by Europe (11%), Caucasus (8%) and North Africa (6%)

--------------------
martiko
dieu, le vrai! certifié France
martiko
5138 messages postés
   Posté le 25-03-2012 à 15:39:05   Voir le profil de martiko (Offline)   Répondre à ce message   Envoyer un message privé à martiko   

massirio a écrit :

Citation :

le site est de 2500 ans avant notre ère et les groupes mtDNA J et T ainsi que R1a étaient déjà en Europe et sur le nombre de squelettes ce n'est pas une proportion importante. On trouve parfois au pays basque des mtDNA K aussi et même si c'est rare.
Les pic de J se trouve en Allemagne, je crois, et T2 en Yougoslavie/Ukraine.


Sur18 indivius G2a il y avait 6 J1 et deux T2 ce qui fait quasiment la moitié.

Et 3000 ans avant jc il n'y avait ps R1a en Europe. Les premiers R1a en Europe datent de la céramique cordé. On n'a pas retrouvé R1a dans de l'adn ancien en Europe de l'ouest.

Les mtDNA T2 on remplacé les lignées K en yougoslavie par la necessité de tolérer les lactoses et malgré yDNA I2a.
Et les groupe les assimilant e mieux sont les H, T et J qui ont donc un meilleure chance de survie dans une époque néolithique avec l'arrivée de l'élevage.
Exemple T1 de l'indus jusqu'avec l'envahisseur arabe se répandre jusqu'en Espagne.


Edité le 25-03-2012 à 15:43:13 par martiko




--------------------
aime la littératures
massirio
388 messages postés
   Posté le 25-03-2012 à 15:43:09   Voir le profil de massirio (Offline)   Répondre à ce message   Envoyer un message privé à massirio   

martiko a écrit :



Les mtDNA T2 on remplacé les lignées K en yougoslavie par la necessité de tolérer les lactoses et malgré yDNA I2a.


Non T2 n'est pas tolérant au lactase. Les individus testés G2a dans le site rubanné allemand étaient tous intolérant au lactase, et il y avait 10 T parmi eux (dont T2).
T2 est clairement lié au couran néolithique rubanné, c'est pour ça que son maximum est en Yougoslavie.

--------------------
martiko
dieu, le vrai! certifié France
martiko
5138 messages postés
   Posté le 25-03-2012 à 15:52:44   Voir le profil de martiko (Offline)   Répondre à ce message   Envoyer un message privé à martiko   

j'ai vérifié, effectivement T2 est associé au début de l'agriculture et peu tolérant aux lactoses en fait c'est T1 qui est tolérant. Et c'est T1 qu'on retrouve associé aux kourganes et aux arabes.
T*, T1 semblent être très séparé de T2. Déjà au niveau du HVRs.


Edité le 25-03-2012 à 16:16:03 par martiko




--------------------
aime la littératures
martiko
dieu, le vrai! certifié France
martiko
5138 messages postés
   Posté le 25-03-2012 à 16:14:38   Voir le profil de martiko (Offline)   Répondre à ce message   Envoyer un message privé à martiko   

massirio a écrit :

Citation :

le site est de 2500 ans avant notre ère et les groupes mtDNA J et T ainsi que R1a étaient déjà en Europe et sur le nombre de squelettes ce n'est pas une proportion importante. On trouve parfois au pays basque des mtDNA K aussi et même si c'est rare.
Les pic de J se trouve en Allemagne, je crois, et T2 en Yougoslavie/Ukraine.


Sur18 indivius G2a il y avait 6 J1 et deux T2 ce qui fait quasiment la moitié.

Et 3000 ans avant jc il n'y avait ps R1a en Europe. Les premiers R1a en Europe datent de la céramique cordé. On n'a pas retrouvé R1a dans de l'adn ancien en Europe de l'ouest.


c'est évident qu'il y a une incohérence du fait de mettre T1 e T2 ensemble.
On ne peut pas assembler le destin de T1 et T2 qui semble très différents.
Et c'est confirmé par la source EUPEDIA :
Haplogroup T is thought to have originated in the Middle East or North-East Africa at least 12,000 years ago. It is found throughout Europe, the northern half of Africa to Central Asia and Siberia, with pockets in India and North-West China (Xinjiang). The highest concentration of T1 has been observed in North-East Africa, Anatolia and Bulgaria, which suggests a Neolithic diffusion from Egypt to the Balkans. T2, the most subclade of T in Europe, is particularly common in North-East Europe and around the Aegean Sea. The overall distribution of haplogroup T points at an early Neolithic migration from North-East Africa to Eastern Europe, then a dispersal following the migration pattern of the Indo-Europeans (especially Y-DNA haplogroup R1a) to Europe and South Asia.


Edité le 25-03-2012 à 16:19:32 par martiko




--------------------
aime la littératures
massirio
388 messages postés
   Posté le 25-03-2012 à 16:16:19   Voir le profil de massirio (Offline)   Répondre à ce message   Envoyer un message privé à massirio   

martiko a écrit :

j'ai vérifié, effectivement T2 est associé au début de l'agriculture et peu tolérant aux lactoses en fait c'est T1 qui est tolérant. Et c'est T1 qu'on retrouve associé aux kourganes et aux arabes.
T*, T1 semblent être très séparé de T2.


Oui en effet. Je ne savais pas qu'on avait testé de l'adn de kourganes.

--------------------
thersite
Malheureux qui comme Thersite est incompris.
thersite
660 messages postés
   Posté le 26-03-2012 à 17:08:22   Voir le profil de thersite (Offline)   Répondre à ce message   Envoyer un message privé à thersite   

Je n'ai gardé que ceux qui concerne l'adn mt dans le post initial de Massirio.
massirio a écrit :

Starcevo Culture and Linear Pottery Culture (c. 8,000 to 6,500 ybp ; Central & Southeast Europe)

Haak et al. (2005) and Haak et al. (2010) LBK sites in Germany and one in Austria dating from 5500 BCE to 4900 BCE. ]
Out of the 38 mtDNA lineages 1 N1a , 1 N1a1a , 2 N1a1a1 , 2 N1a1a2 , 1 N1a1b ) , 1 U3, 1 U5a1a), 7 K, 4 J, 10 T (3 T2), 3 HV, 8 H, 2 V, 2 W.

Bramanti et al. (2008)LBK site of Vedrovice (5300 BCE) in the Czech Republic. 2 K, 1 J1c, 2 T2, 1 H.

Guba et al. (2011) 11 Neolithic skeletons from Hungary.
5 from Korös culture (5500 BCE), 2 N9a 1 C5.
1 had a series of mutations not seen in any haplogroup to this day (16235G, 16261T, 16291T, 16293G, 16304C).
1 didn't have any mutation from the CRS in the HVS-I region and is therefore undetermined.

6 from LBK-related Alföld Culture (5250-5000 BCE) 1 N1a, 1 N1a1b, 1 N9a), 1 D1 or G1a1 .
2 undetermined (CRS and 16324C mutation reported as M/R24 ).

Cucuteni-Trypillian Culture (c. 7,500 to 4,750 ybp ; Romania, Moldova, Ukraine)
Nikitin et al. (2010) Verteba Cave (3600-2500 BCE) in Western Ukraine. 1 pre-HV, 1 HV, 2 V, 2 H , 1 J, 1 T4.


Cardium Pottery Culture (c. 8,400 to 4,700 ybp ; Mediterranean Europe)

Chandler et al. (2005) : 2 U (1 U5), 1 H, 1 V.

Lacan et al. (2011) tested 29 skeletons from a 5,000-year-old site in Treilles, Languedoc, France.
6 U (4 U5, 1 U5b1c), 2 K1a, 6 J1, 2 T2b, 2 HV0, 3 H1, 3 H3, 1 V, 4 X2.

Lacan et al. (2011 bis) 7,000-year-old Avellaner Cave in Cogolls, Catalonia, Spain :
3 K1a, 2 T2b, 1 H3, 1 U5.

Fernández et al. (2006) and Gamba et al. (2008) analysed the mitochondrial HVR-I in 37 bones from 17 archaeological sites located around Castellón de la Plana, Valencia, Spain. Most of the results were inconclusive though. Out of the 12 mtDNA sequences :
4 L3 , 4 H (3 CRS ?) 2 R0, 1 HV or H, 1 V, 1 D .

Gamba et al. (2011) (5000-5500 BCE) Can Sadurni and Chaves and three Late Early Neolithic (4250-3700 BCE) from Sant Pau del Camp, all around Barcelona, Spain. The coding region was also tested to confirm the haplogroups.
4 N* , 4 H (1 H20), 1 U5, 3 K, 1 X1 .

Atlantic Megalithic Culture (c. 7,000 to 4,000 ybp ; Western Europe)

Deguilloux et al. (2010) Péré tumulus, a megalithic long mound (4200 BCE) in Brittany:
1 N1a , 1 U5b, 1 X2.

Sampietro et al. (2007) HVRI m sequences of 11 Cami de Can Grau site (3500 BCE) in Granollers, Catalonia, Spain:
4 H (3 CRS ?), 2 J, 2 T2, 1 U4, 1 I1, 1 W1.

Fernández et al. (2008) Nerja caves near Málaga, Andalusia, Spain . The first individual (3875 BCE) carried the mutations 16126C 16264T 16270T 16278T 16293G 16311C, and the second 16129A, 16264T, 16270T, 16278T, 16293G, 16311C. Both sequences could correspond either to haplogroup H11a (typical of Central Europe) or more probably L1b1 (found in the Canaries and Northwest Africa).



Izagirre and C. de la Rua (1999) from four Basque prehistoric sites.
San Juan Ante Portam Latinam (3300-3042 BCE) in Araba :
61 samples : 23 H, 10 J, 11 U, 14 K, 3 T or X.

Pico Ramos (2790-2100 BCE) in Bizkaia yielded 24 results :
9 H, 4 J, 3 U, 4 K, 4 T or X.

Longar (2580-2450 BCE) in Nafarroa had 27 individuals :
11 H, 4 U, 6 K, 4 T or X and two other unidentified haplogroups.

Tres Montes in Navarra (2130 BCE) ; 1 L2 and two undetermined (16224C and 16126C+16311C).
The authors noted the conspicuous absence of haplogroup V, now present at a relatively high frequency among the Basques (6.5%).

Fernández et al. (2005) Abauntz (2240 BCE) in Navarra .
1 CRS (no mutation found). Another had 16126C+16311C, which would be R0a, HV0a or a subclade of H, among many other possibilities. The last one (16256T) could be H1x, H14 or even U5a.


Funnelbeaker Culture (c. 6,000 to 4,700 ybp ; Northern Europe)

Malmström et al. (2009) megalithic site (3500-2500 BCE)[/g] in Gökhem, Sweden.[/g] They identified haplogroups H, J and T.

Bramanti et al. (2009) Ostorf (3200-3000 BCE) in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany:
3 U5 (1 U5a), 1 K, 2 T2e, 1 J.


Bell Beaker Culture (c. 4,400 to 3,800 ybp ; Western Europe)

Melchior et al. (2010) Damsbo site (4200 BCE) in Denmark: 1 U4 , 1 U5a2a.


La plus importante étude d'adn mt en France n=1385
Tous du macro-haplogroupe N, mais l'haplogroupe N très peu nombreux
N1b 0,25%

N est 39 mutations (28 dans la partie codante) sous l'"Eve mitochondriale" et 5 mutations(toutes dans la partie codante) de l'haplogroupe L3 dont l'origine est l'Afrique Orientale vers l'Ethiopie/Somalie/Soudan. La datation de N par les mutations est à peu près le tiers de celle de l'"Eve mt" qui est a peu près à 58/60 mutations dont 40/42 codantes des femmes actuelles. De légères variations dues aux aléas des mutations suivant les branches, bien entendu.

Pourquoi si peu de N et son abondance dans le néolithique ?
N1a : Arabian Peninsula, Tanzania, Kenya, Ethiopia and Egypt. Found also in Central Asia and Southern Siberia.
N9a : East Asia, Southeast Asia and Central Asia.

R0 0,36% 4 (dont 2) sous N
HV* 1,73% 1 (dont 1) sous R0
HV0 4,77% 2(dont 1) sous HV
V sous HV0a, 4 (dont 2) sous HV. (inclus dans HV0?)
HV1 0,14%
H 45,56% pas de précision pour les fréquences de ses branches, dommage ! H H1 est 1 mutation dans la partie variable sous H.

U est 3 mutations (dont 3) sous N.
U4 2,31%
U5 8,30% 5 (dont 3) sous U (pratiquement équivalent à H, 44 contre 46 (dont32 contre 33) sous "Eve" .
U2 1,44%
U3 0,94% U1 et U7 insignifiant, pas de U6 ?

K 8,74% sous U8'K, 10 mutations (dont 8) sous U

J 7,65% 6 (dont 3) sous JT, 8 (dont 4) sous R
T* 6,86% 10 (dont 9) sous JT , 12 (dont 9) sous R
T1 1,66%

I 2,02% sous N1e'I, 16 (dont 10) sous N
W 1,88% sous N2, 16 (dont 11) sous N
X 0,79% 4 (dont 2) sous N

Je rappelle que l'haplogroupe L est presque entièrement africain. Preque exclusif de l'Afrique sub-saharienne, L3 a donné naissance eux 2 macohaplogroupes suivant à l'époque du "out of Africa" en Arabie ou en Inde, les côtes du Golfe du Bengale sont souvent préférées par les spécialistes.
- Le macrohaplogroupe M est surtout est-asiatique, océanien ou amérindien (C et D).Ses descendants sont M1, M2, M3, M4'45, M5, M6, M7, M8, M9, M10'42, M12'G, M13, M14, M15, M21, M27, M28, M29'Q, M31'32, M33, M34, M35, M36, M39, M40, M41, M44, M46, M47'50, M48, M49, M51, C, D, E, G, Q, Z.
_ Le macrohaplogroupe N est éparpillé sur les 5 continents. Presque exclusif en Europe, dominant en Afrique du Nord et Asie de l'ouest. Présent en Afrique de l'Est, Asie de l'est, Océanie et Amérique (Améridien A et X). Ses descendants sont N1'5, N2, N9, N13, N14, N21, N22, A, I, O, R, S, W, X, Y.

Le macro-haplogroupe R descend de N. Très dominant en Europe et Asie de l'ouest. Présent en Afrique du nord, de l'est, Australie, Nlle Guinée, Amérindiens (B) Ses descendants sont R0, R1, R2'JT, R3, R5, R6'7, R8, R9, R11'B, R12'21, R14, R22, R23, R30, R31, B, F, HV, H, J, K, P, T, U, V.

L'opinion prédominante dit qu'en 10.000 ans il y a une moyenne statistique de 3 mutations, dont 2 dans la partie codante.

Mon opinion est qu'il faut prendre 14.000 à 20.000 ans pour 3 mutations, dont 2 dans la partie codante.


Edité le 27-03-2012 à 13:18:46 par thersite




--------------------
Haut de pagePages : 1  
 
 LE FORUM DES CERCLOSOPHES  Forums des anciens  Section histoire et archéologie  Adn néolithiqueNouveau sujet   Répondre
 
Identification rapide :         
 
Divers
Imprimer ce sujet
Aller à :   
 
 
créer forum